‘ You might come out of the water every time singing ‘

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is a 3D composition that plays through 12 speakers and a wooden platform which vibrates under the audience as the shark driven music hovers and spins.

SharkPlatform1

Made after Matthews month’s residency on the Galapagos Islands (2009) in which she dived with, recorded underwater and filmed hammerheads, the piece uses the traces of six sharks to play six digital oscillators live, variably mixed with processings and underwater recordings making a music that thrills and relaxes as it spins audience through new architectures.

“I’ve never been a shark before – this is maybe how it feels to see with electrical impulses in deep ocean.”  Marcus Coates. 2012

‘Sharks are older than dinosaurs. They’ve evolved with the planet developing extraordinary perceptive mechanisms learning to navigate in straight lines at depths as great as 400m by tracing the shifts in the earth’s magnetic crust. They are still considered just to be extremely aggressive and are slaughtered in vast numbers for their fins to make soup. A shark in fact has to be one of the most sophisticated of earth’s animals.’ KM 2009

Made by Kaffe Matthews in  collaboration with the shark (Sphryna Lewini) trackers Cesar Peñaherrera, Dr Alex Hearn, James Ketchum, Dr Peter Klimley,(UC Davis) and MigraMar,   and with Dr Adam Parkinson on software instrument coding.

Matthews Galapagos residency was supported by the Charles Darwin Foundation, the Galapagos Conservation Trust , the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation

 

‘ You might come out of the water every time singing ‘

is a new experience in musical composition and perception. Damien Hirst’s pickled tiger now has a serious contender.  Mark Sheerin.

It has been shown at:

The Bluecoat, Liverpool.   May 4th-July 1st 2012.   REVIEW 2

The Fruitmarket, Edinburgh, Scotland.    November 2nd – January 2013.

The Gulbenkian Foundation, Contemporary Art Museum, Lisbon, Portugal, as part of the Galápagos exhibition,  April 18th -July 13th 2013.

With special thanks to Richard Vera, Greg Hilty, Felipé Cruz,  Daniel Rivas,  Abigail Rowley, David Horwell, Elke Hartmann and the red ant scientist from Texas.